Turkish forces sets up new observation post in Syria

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TOPSHOT - A Turkish-backed Syrian rebel fighters hold Turkish national flag (R) and Free Syrian Army flags (L) at a checkpoint in the Syrian town of Azaz on a road leading to Afrin, on February 1, 2018. Clashes raged between Turkish-backed forces and Kurdish militia in Syria's Afrin region on January 31, 2018, as wounded civilians fled intense Turkish air strikes. Turkey and allied Syrian rebels have pressed on with Operation Olive Branch in the Kurdish-controlled Afrin enclave despite mounting international concern and reports of rising civilian casualties. / AFP PHOTO / OZAN KOSE

The ninth observation post in Idlib province is located 88 kms from Turkey’s border with Syria. Ankara is set to gradually establish 12 such points from the province’s north to south.

Turkish military has set up its ninth observation post in Syria’s northwestern province of Idlib, the military announced on its Twitter account on Saturday.

The new observation post is located 88 kms from the Turkey-Syria border, Anadolu Agency reported.

It said the 100-vehicle military convoy was on its way to the Morek region to establish the post.

TSK

@TSKGnkur

İDLİB BÖLGESİNDE GÖZLEM NOKTALARINDAN 9’UNCUSU OLAN 9 NO’LU GÖZLEM NOKTASI TESİS EDİLMİŞTİR.

More observation posts

Under the Astana, Kazakhstan agreement, Turkey is set to gradually establish 12 observation points from Idlib’s north to south.

Idlib has faced intense attacks by the Bashar al Assad regime after a vicious civil war broke out in 2011.

Since March 2015, Idlib is no longer under the control of the Assad regime and has been overrun by military opposition groups and armed anti-regime organisations.

Seven-year bloodletting

Syria’s seven-year bloodletting has left around 450,000 killed.

More than 11 million people — about half the country’s prewar population — have been displaced from their homes, including over 5 million who are living as refugees outside Syria, according to the United Nations.

The UN has estimated the material cost of the war damage at close to $250 billion.